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  • dannyboystories 12:16 PM on February 23, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    The Rock, and the Hard Place. 

    Watching the horrible spectacle in Kiev, I’m taken by the deadly clashes between the national police and who we are told are ordinary citizens.

    The sobering thought that keeps popping up in my mind is could it happen here? “Never in a million years,” you say. I really wonder.

    There are clues that may give one pause. Things like more than 700 million rounds of ammunition purchased by the Department of Homeland Security [DHS], presumably for distribution to various enforcement divisions like the FBI and others. Add this purchase to the simple fact DHS has injected itself into every local regulatory and law enforcement agency in the nation, presumably under the cloak of being “helpful”, and there is the apparent definition of a possible federal takeover of state’s rights through local agencies. And, DHS has spread plenty of money into local recession strapped budgets, creating relationships on the local level that might not be easily trumped.

    Then, there is the expansion of authority for the Internal Revenue Service [IRS], promulgated largely by the new Affordable Care Act [ObamaCare]. In this latter instance, there is little recourse to strong-arm tactics by the IRS looking carefully into every nook and cranny of your personal behavior and finances. ObamaCare gives IRS agents much more power over taxpayers under the guise of “affordable health care” initiatives.

    Now, comes notice the Federal Communications Commission [FCC] is planning a clear “fact finding” intrusion into the operation of news reporting agencies. Let me be clear, I have little use for so-called journalists who promote their own agenda, rather than remain impartial providing the facts for citizens to make their own decisions. Hiding behind a “contract third party” does not dilute that this planned activity is a clear violation of First Amendment protections given the press. It is more than disturbing this could be an effort to completely control information provided to the public by a free press. Consider for a moment small newspapers, radio, and television stations who may be quickly intimidated and do not have the financial where-with-all to fight these “spies”. It is very troubling.

    So, in just these three simple examples there appears to be enough to cause reasonable second thoughts in the minds of any patriotic individual, regardless their political preferences. I have not mentioned many other examples.

    Am I fear mongering? I don’t think so. These are simply cause for looking deeply and suspiciously into the intentions of Federal Government administrations. — D. C. ‘Dan’ Lee, http://www.dannyboystories.com

     

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  • dannyboystories 10:10 AM on February 7, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Citizen by Accident 

    Citizen by Accident.

     
  • dannyboystories 10:08 AM on February 7, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Citizen by Accident 

    The public school system in the United States is broken.

    Apparently, American students, by and large, rank below students in other countries in mathematics and the sciences–well below–but, did you know most students in the United States graduating from the 8th and 12th grades need to know little or nothing about the United States Constitution? Do YOU know what your local school teaches or requires students to be proficient with respect to the United States and its Constitution?

    It seems our home-grown United States citizens are ignorant of the United States Constitution, arguably the most important American document! The Constitution is what keeps us free and independent, secures our liberties.

    Many states require no concentrated learning about the Constitution for a young person to graduate from high school! Children need only take ‘X’ number of credits of “social studies” to graduate. The result is, in my view, virtually no high school graduating senior has even a modicum of knowledge or understanding of the Constitution or the American way of life. Of course, the push for “Common Core”, essentially forcing mediocrity on all, will make our children even less knowledgeable about anything.

    Here is what a “green card” resident must demonstrate to become a citizen of these United States [http://www.test-guide.com/citizenship-test-overview.html]:

    1. Determine if you are currently a U.S. Citizen – if you were born in the U.S. or one of your parents is a U.S. citizen, you may already be a United States citizen
    2. Determine if you are eligible to become a U.S. Citizen – view the eligibility requirements at http://www.uscis.gov/citizenship
    3. Complete the appropriate application forms – prepare and complete Form N-400 (Application for Naturalization)

    4. Submit your application form – including your application, documents, fees and photographs
    5. Complete your background checks – applicants must be fingerprinted and have background checks completed
    6. Complete your Naturalization interview – applicants are required to be interviewed by an officer of the USCIS.  During this interview an applicant will be asked questions about their application form and background.  Additionally, applicants will take their English and Civics test at their interview.
    7. Receive a decision on your Naturalization – your application will either be granted or denied
    8. Take the Oath of Allegiance – if your application is granted, you will be required to take an Oath of Allegiance at a naturalization ceremony.

    The Civics portion of the U.S. Citizenship exam consists of 10 questions.  In order to pass the exam, you will need to correctly answer at least 6 questions.  The questions asked will not be multiple choice – you will need to correctly state an answer.  The 10 questions are pulled from a list of 100 approved questions.

    Applicants are given two chances to take the test per application.  If you do not pass the test on your first try, you will be able to retake the failed portion of your exam approximately 60 to 90 days after your interview date.

    The Civics test contains questions on American Government, American History, and Integrated Civics. Specific questions are from the following subjects:

    • Principles of American Democracy – The Constitution, Bill of Rights, Declaration of Independence
    • System of Government – Branches of the Government and their Roles, 
    • Rights and Responsibilities – Specific rights of a U.S. Citizen
    • Colonial Period and Independence – Important figures in the U.S. Revolutionary period
    • 1800s – Important U.S. events during the 1800s
    • Recent American History and Other Important Historical Information – Recent events of historical importance
    • Geography – The geographical features of the United States
    • Symbols – The U.S. Flag and National Anthem
    • Holidays – Important U.S. holidays
    • [Source: http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS/Office%20of%20Citizenship/Citizenship%20Resource%20Center%20Site/Publications/100q.pdf ]

    Click on the link above and review the 100 questions. My bet is most Americans today cannot pass a test including 10 of those questions at random. As a minimum, the 100 questions should be a part of every social studies curriculum today, but they are not. Why? Could YOU pass a test?

    In my view, lack of understanding of the United States Constitution, and the founding fathers history that built this country is part and parcel the reason why the federal government is burgeoning out of control and American liberties are being legislated out of existence. — D. C. ‘Dan’ Lee, http://www.dannyboystories.com

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    • You already have a green card
    • You are at least 18 years old.
    • You have lived in the U.S. lawfully as a permanent resident for at least five years unless you are a spouse of a U.S. citizen, refugee, or received your green card through political asylum.
    • During those five years, you have been physically present in the U.S. for at least half of the time.
    • You have not spent more than one year at a time outside the U.S.
    • You have not established a primary home in another country.
    • You have lived in the state or district where you are filing your application for at least three months.
    • You have “good moral character”.
    • You can read, write and speak English.
    • You can pass a test about U.S. history and government.
    • You will swear that you believe in the principles of the U.S. Constitution and will be loyal to the U.S.

    – See more at: http://immigration.findlaw.com/citizenship/requirements-for-applying-for-citizenship-in-the-united-states.html?DCMP=ADC-IMMI_CitizenshipBoardModifier-Requirements&HBX_PK=+citizenship++requirements++for++united++states#sthash.pmam0fqj.dpuf

    • You already have a green card
    • You are at least 18 years old.
    • You have lived in the U.S. lawfully as a permanent resident for at least five years unless you are a spouse of a U.S. citizen, refugee, or received your green card through political asylum.
    • During those five years, you have been physically present in the U.S. for at least half of the time.
    • You have not spent more than one year at a time outside the U.S.
    • You have not established a primary home in another country.
    • You have lived in the state or district where you are filing your application for at least three months.
    • You have “good moral character”.
    • You can read, write and speak English.
    • You can pass a test about U.S. history and government.
    • You will swear that you believe in the principles of the U.S. Constitution and will be loyal to the U.S.

    – See more at: http://immigration.findlaw.com/citizenship/requirements-for-applying-for-citizenship-in-the-united-states.html?DCMP=ADC-IMMI_CitizenshipBoardModifier-Requirements&HBX_PK=+citizenship++requirements++for++united++states#sthash.pmam0fqj.dpuf

     
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